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Title of the document "Welcome to ARVIGEN HEALTHCARE",The Next Generation prevention.

Wednesday, December 26, 2018

Midlife Women Transitioning to Menopause Have a Higher Risk of Metabolic Syndrome, Which Predisposes to Heart Disease and Type 2 Diabetes

Multi-ethnic study shows midlife women with more physical activity or a lower calorie diet have less risk of developing the disease
Midlife women transitioning to menopause may be able to lower their risk of developing heart disease and type 2 diabetes, if they exercise more or eat a lower calorie diet, according to a new study published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
According to recent data, one in five Americans has metabolic syndrome. These patients are diagnosed when they have three or more of these risk factors: large amount of abdominal body fat, low (“good”) cholesterol, high levels of fat in the blood, high blood pressure, and high blood glucose.
“Previous studies have largely focused on cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in postmenopausal women. This study is unique because it focuses on an earlier stage in women’s lives, the menopausal transition in midlife, to potentially prevent such diseases from occurring,” says lead study author Jennifer S. Lee, MD, PhD, associate professor of Medicine, Stanford Medical Center and the Veteran Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System in Stanford, Calif. “Discovering which modifiable factors like physical activity and a lower calorie diet are more common in midlife women who recover from metabolic syndrome, in this study, could better inform what preventive strategies to consider in women earlier in their lives.”
In the prospective, multi-ethnic cohort study, researchers studied 3,003 (1412 non-Hispanic White, 851 Black, 272 Japanese, 237 Hispanic, 231 Chinese) midlife women undergoing the transition to menopause. They identified patterns of cardiometabolic risk and found central obesity to be the most common factor for causing metabolic syndrome. They also found that lifestyle changes like more physical activity and a lower calorie diet could help patients recover from metabolic syndrome. Additionally, physically active women in the study were less likely to get incident metabolic syndrome than inactive women.
The study received support from the National Institutes on Aging, the National Institute of Nursing Research, and the Office of Research on Women’s Health.

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